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20100901
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compete for federal dollars for their own reform programs, using student test scores to evaluate teachers, even to set their pay, and firing teachers for poor performance. the head of the national education association, whose 3.2 million members make it the largest union in america, down played the difference and said he agrees with the president that the status quo is unacceptable. >> we support rigorous and fair evaluation systems. i can tell you educators don't want incompetent or ineffective teachers in the classroom. >> reporter: some advocates of education reform are urging the president to compromise with republicans if they take control of the house next year. you can bet that if he does that, his relations with the teachers unions will take a turn for the worse. katie? >> couric: chip, i know president is following the lead of other countries that do already have longer school years by about a month. how does he pro pose the do this? and how does he expect, or does he expect, to get blowback from parents and kids? >> reporter: absolutely, katie. it wouldn't be done by law. what t
afford it. get california working again-for all of us. >> couric: tonight, losing ground. the dramatic impact of the recession, americans making less than a decade ago, living in homes that have fallen in value. i'm katie couric. also tonight, can president obama recapture the magic? in 2008 he inspired the young to vote in droves. can he get them back to the polls in november? and faith and knowledge in this one nation under god, many americans know surprisingly little about religion. >> we're a nation of religious illiterates. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the recession may be officially over, but it has left the confidence of americans badly shaken. and numbers just out from the government today show why. since the recession began, household incomes have fallen nearly 3% to just over $50,000. adjusting for inflation, americans are making $4,000 less than they were a decade ago. and their biggest investment, their home, has lost nearly 6% of i
. >> reporter: the top 20% of earners in the country now make more than half of the income generated in the u.s. that's up from 49.7% in 2007. and the poorest 20% earn only 3% of the country's income. the great divide is a college degree. the unemployment rate for college graduates is less than 5%. for those with just a high school diploma, it's more than 10%. and according to another study, the median income for a college grad-- nearly $56,000-- is more than double that of workers who finished only high school. >> low-skill labor is really in trouble in this economy. the demand for their services is shrinking like crazy. the traditional ways that they moved into the middle-class-- manufacturing, construction-- are dead in the water. >> reporter: and that income gap may only grow wider even as the economy recovers because the top end usually recovers faster than the bottom. katie? >> couric: anthony mason, thank you, anthony. and jobs are the big issue in the midterm elections. election day, by the way, is five weeks away, but early voting is already under way in seven states. with control of c
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)